ORDER ON OR BEFORE 16TH DEC TO GUARANTEE PRE - XMAS DELIVERY

We are not alone
Every body has companions.

In our daily lives, we carry trillions of microbes around with us.

It sounds a little scary, but fret not! We were born with these microbes. They are a part of our body's ecosystem and provide a mutually-beneficial support network. Each area of our body has its own unique microbiome of microbes, which includes good bacteria, fungi and viruses.

These microbes help produce vitamins and hormones and generate biomolecules which prevent the growth of harmful bacteria. They are known to affect everything from the metabolism to the immune system. They are also thought to affect mood. They are the good guys in a world full of bad guys attacking our skin.

We are not alone
Every body has companions.

In our daily lives, we carry trillions of microbes around with us.

In our daily lives, we carry trillions of microbes around with us.It sounds a little scary, but fret not! We were born with these microbes. They are a part of our body's ecosystem and provide amutually-beneficial support network. Each area of our body has its own unique microbiome of microbes, which includes good bacteria, fungi and viruses.These microbes help produce vitamins and hormones and generate biomolecules which prevent the growth of harmful bacteria. They are known to affect everything from the metabolism to the immunesystem. They are also thought to affect mood. They are the good guysin a world full of bad guys attacking our skin.

Our skin microbiome is a community of microbes that lives on our skin. They feed our skin and stimulate our skin's immunity.

The body's microbiome has been around since man evolved. We are only beginning to understand its importance in our body's health. The skin is the largest organ of the human body; it is our protective shield and home to an ecosystem of diverse microorganisms - bacteria, fungi and viruses

We carry our microbes around with us our whole lifetime.

When we are born our skins are immediately colonised and our immune system engages with these microbes to develop a complex immune response. Our skin's immune system and microbiome communicate and respond to each other's needs. This teeming horde of microbes living on us comprises the skin microbiome - our first line of defence against infection. It may be hard to picture and become comfortable with the fact that we are covered head to toe with these microbes - both alive and dead. It is important to remember that without these friendly microorganisms we would not survive. We need these to kill off infective pathogens. Our bodies, like our diets, need to be in balance. Our body's ecosystem requires balance which enables us to have a healthy and happy microbiome.

Every body hosts over 1,000,000,000,000 invisible microbes of many kinds

Every body hosts over 1,000,000,000,000 invisible microbes of many kinds

We carry our microbes around with us our whole lifetime.

When we are born our skins are immediately colonised and our immune system engages with these microbes to develop a complex immune response. Our skin's immune system and microbiome communicate and respond to each other's needs. This teeming horde of microbes living on us comprises the skin microbiome our first line of defence against infection. It may be hard to picture and become comfortable with the fact that we are covered head to toe with these microbes - both alive and dead. It is important to remember that without these friendly microorganisms we would not survive. We need these to kill off infective pathogens. Our bodies, like our diets, need to be in balance. Our body's ecosystem requires balance which enables us to have a healthy and happy microbiome.

The outer layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, is a dynamic site where dead cells are continuously shed. The skin is known to maintain elasticity and condition by retaining moisture with a natural moisturising factor which includes lactic acid and salts and also a natural oil. The moisturising factor retains moisture on the skin. The skin’s natural oil, sebum, provides an oily/waxy envelope trapping moisture and preventing dehydration.

In the past it had been thought that these salts and the oily layer were the principal factors in maintaining skin health. Now we recognise that the microbiome, containing a sturdy population of microorganisms, has an increasingly appreciated role in skin health.

Just like in the gut, microorganisms on the skin repel harmful bacteria, interact with our immune system and contribute to the skin's barrier function. Microbes living in our skin-pores, hair follicles, sweat-glands, etc. all help our skin to remain healthy. They secrete important molecules, such as antimicrobial peptides and short-chain fatty acids. These are important for reducing moisture loss. They are anti-inflammatories and they maintain skin pH. This ecosystem controls our skin and is responsible for everything from how well products are absorbed into the skin and to the maintenance of its overall health and well-being.